Research Data at Cambridge – highlights of the year so far

By Dr Sacha Jones, Research Data Coordinator

This year we have continued, as always, to provide support and services for researchers to help with their research data management and open data practices. So far in 2020, we have approved more than 230 datasets into our institutional repository, Apollo. This includes Apollo’s 2000th dataset on the impact of health warning labels on snack selection, which represents a shining example of reproducible research, involving the full gamut: preregistration, and sharing of consent forms, code, protocols, data. There are other studies that have sparked media interest for which the data are also openly available in Apollo, such as the data supporting research that reports the development of a wireless device that can convert sunlight, carbon dioxide and water into a carbon-neutral fuel. Or, data supporting a study that has used computational modelling to explain why blues and greens are the brightest colours in nature. Also, and in the year of COVID, a dataset was published in April on the ability of common fabrics to filter ultrafine particles, associated with an article in BMJ Open. Sharing data associated with publications is critical for the integrity of many disciplines and best practice in the majority of studies, but there is also an important responsibility of science communication in particular to bring research datasets to the forefront. This point was discussed eloquently this summer in a guest blog post in Unlocking Research by Itamar Shatz, a researcher and Cambridge Data Champion. Making datasets open permits their reuse, and if you have wondered how research data is reused and then read this comprehensive data sharing and reuse case study written by the Research Data team’s Dominic Dixon. This centres on the use and value of the Mammographic Image Society database, published in Apollo five years ago. 

This year has seen the necessary move from our usual face-to-face Research Data Management (RDM) training to provision of training online. This has led us to produce an online training session in RDM, covering topics such as data organisation, storage, back up and sharing, as well as data management plans. This forms one component of a broader Research Skills Guide – an online course for Cambridge researchers on publishing, managing data, finding and disseminating research  – developed by Dr Bea Gini, the OSC’s training coordinator. We have also contributed to a ‘Managing your study resources’ CamGuide for Master’s students, providing guidance on how to work reproducibly. In collaboration with several University stakeholders we released last month new guidance on the use of electronic research notebooks (ERNs), providing information on the features of ERNs and guidance to help researchers select one that is suitable. 

At the start of this year we invited members of the University to apply to become Data Champions, joining the pre-existing community of 72 Data Champions. The 2020 call was very successful, with us welcoming 56 new Data Champions to the programme. The community has expanded this year, not only in terms of numbers of volunteers but also in terms of disciplinary focus, where there are now Data Champions in several areas of the arts, humanities and social sciences in particular where there were none previously. During this year, we have held forums in person and then online, covering themes such as how to curate manual research records, ideas for RDM guidance materials, data management in the time of coronavirus, and data practices in the arts and humanities and how these can be best supported. We look forward to further supporting and advocating the fantastic work of the Cambridge Data Champions in the months and years to come.  

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